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Category: Chiropractic
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In a May 12, 2003 release from the "Canada NewsWire" was some information and advice about gardening. The news release reported on a new poll just released that reveals that gardening and yard work are the number one causes of back and/or neck pain in the spring and summer months. The poll was conducted by national research firm Pollara, where 500 Ontario Canada chiropractors were asked what were the largest causes of back and neck pain among their patients. The results of the poll showed that eighty-eight per cent of Ontario chiropractors report that working in the yard and garden are the most common sources of back and neck pain they see during the warm weather season. Golf ranked in second place at 31 per cent, tied with outdoor sports in general at 30 per cent.

Dr. Dennis Mizel, President of the Ontario Chiropractic Association noted, "In Canada, gardening is an estimated $3.5 billion business and all that digging, lifting, raking, pruning, planting, weeding and watering can cause significant strain to the muscles and back." Dr. Mizel continued, "The good news is that it's preventable. Gardening can be a serious workout. That's why we're encouraging people to treat it like any other kind of exercise. Warming-up before digging in, and using the proper techniques and tools can go a long way to letting people enjoy the results of their labor pain-free."

The Ontario Chiropractic Association is partnering with the Ontario Horticultural Society, the Garden Clubs of Ontario and Sheridan Nurseries to help get the word out about back safe yard work and gardening. "Thousands of people visit our gardening centers once the warm weather hits," says Mary-Beth Brown, Marketing Coordinator, Sheridan Nurseries. "So we're pleased to be able to reach our customers with this public education program. It's a good idea to limber up before you get to the gardening centre and start loading supplies into your car or truck, and we always have someone to help out if a customer needs assistance."

In the article the Ontario Chiropractic Association offered several tips for back smart gardening: